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The American History Podcast presents the history of the United States in an engaging, scholarly and entertaining way. Each season we take a topic in American history and dive deep to discover the roots of the issue, and provide our listeners with a lot of history they don't know. Follow the American History Podcast on Twitter: @americanhiscast. Feel free to email me with questions and comments: shawn@theamericanhistorypodcast.com
 
The Bible was first translated into English some time in the 7th century by an unnamed monk known to us as the Venerable Bede. This was the Old English version and the work of translation from Vulgate Latin into Middle English was taken up again in the 14th century by the famous religious dissenter John Wycliffe. Modern translations date from the 16th century onwards and these were sourced from Greek and Hebrew versions as well as Latin. Most translations are made by a large group of scholar ...
 
Elisabeth Braw, scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, presents 'On the Cusp' which focuses on how governments, business and civil society can work together to strengthen countries' defence against existing and emerging threats. Each episode she interviews a guest who is a leader in their respective field.
 
The Journal of American History Podcast features interviews with our authors and conversations with authors whose books on American history have won awards. Episodes are in MP3 format and will be released in the month preceding each Journal of American History (February, May, August and November). Published quarterly by the Organization of American Historians, the Journal of American History is the leading scholarly publication in the field of U.S. history and is well known as the major reso ...
 
“Story in the Public Square” is a year-round initiative to study and celebrate public storytelling. It features an annual conference, lectures, awards and student contests, as well as original scholarship about public storytelling and how those stories can affect the public debate. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, and is directed by visiting fellow G. Wayne Miller with Pell Center executive director Jim Ludes.
 
On Scholars & Saints we'll explore some of the most pressing issues and cutting-edge methods in Mormon Studies, and put them in conversation with scholarship from the discipline of Religious Studies. You might be wondering, what is Mormon Studies? Mormon Studies refers to the broad interdisciplinary efforts of scholars both within and outside the Latter Day Saint tradition to understand the religion founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830. Mormonism includes well known branches like the The Chu ...
 
The Movements is a podcast history of the working class, anti-fascists, revolutionaries, women, people of color, and liberation movements. My history shows are narrative driven and audiobook style, with a focus on serious historical and materialist analysis.History Eps = Scripted Drama, Scholarly Analysis.Stallin' For Time = Opinion, Cuss WordsSupport the show by donating at https://www.patreon.com/movementspod
 
**About Maureen Taylor:** Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada. She’s the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira). She’s been feat ...
 
Step into The Call Room with Dr. Robert Berry as he gives you an inside perspective into health, fitness, medicine and the politics and policies of healthcare. As an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist, Dr. Berry cares for athletes young and old. He performs surgery and provides conservative care for all types of musculoskeletal conditions. As the medical director for sports medicine for one of the largest Health Care Systems in Texas, he gives an insiders perspective on whats ...
 
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show series
 
When schools finished the academic year earlier this summer, they looked forward to the fall with the first cautious optimism anyone had felt in years. But Dr. Ashish Jha has offered level-headed wisdom that the pandemic simply is not over. Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH, is a physician, health policy researcher, and the Dean of the Brown University School…
 
Historian Kevin Starr described Carey McWilliams as "the finest nonfiction writer on California—ever" and "the state's most astute political observer." But as Peter Richardson argues in American Prophet: The Life and Work of Carey McWilliams (University of California Press, 2019), McWilliams was also one of the nation's most versatile and productiv…
 
Twitter is a social media platform that folks either love or hate. It doesn’t generate too much of an in-between feeling. It’s known for short posts and hashtags. It’s the place you go for breaking news and some groups like #GenChat use it to inspire collaboration and social interaction in the genealogy world. There are photo historians on Twitter …
 
This week our guest is Journal of the American Revolution contributor Dean Snow. Although they came to the battle of Saratoga in different ways both continental and militia cavalry played critical roles in the victory. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.Dispatches tarafından oluşturuldu
 
Oklahoma's Black towns aren't just places of the past - they maintain an enduring allure, and look toward the future, argues Karla Slocum in her new book, Black Towns, Black Futures: The Enduring Allure of a Black Place in the American West (UNC Press, 2019). Dr. Slocum, the Thomas Willis Lambeth Chair of Public Policy and a professor of Anthropolo…
 
Underlying every great city is a rich and vibrant culture that shapes the texture of life within. In The Speculative City: Art, Real Estate, and the Making of Global Los Angeles (U Minnesota Press, 2021), Susanna Phillips Newbury teases out how art and Los Angeles shaped one another’s evolution. She compellingly articulates how together they transf…
 
Host Elisabeth Braw speaks to Kusti Salm, Permanent Secretary of the Estonian Ministry of Defence, about Zapad-2021, Russia’s quadrennial military exercise. Salm previously served as the Director General of the Estonian Centre of Defence Investment.Elisabeth Braw tarafından oluşturuldu
 
All regions and places are unique in their own way, but the Ozarks have an enduring place in American culture. Studying the Ozarks offers the ability to explore American life through the lens of one of the last remaining cultural frontiers in American society. Perhaps because the Ozarks were relatively isolated from mainstream American society, or …
 
On July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made history by being the first human beings to walk on the moon. Meanwhile, the third member of the Apollo 11 crew made history of his own: by being the first guy to wait in the car while his friends were on the moon. Sources: Michael Collins: Apollo 11 pilot and 'loneliest man ever' dies aged 90 'Fr…
 
From Double Indemnity to The Godfather, the stories behind some of the greatest films ever made pale beside the story of the studio that made them. In the golden age of Hollywood, Paramount was one of the Big Five studios. Gulf + Western's 1966 takeover of the studio signaled the end of one era and heralded the arrival of a new way of doing busines…
 
From rocky coves at Mendocino and Monterey to San Diego’s reefs, abalone have held a cherished place in California culture for millennia. Prized for iridescent shells and delectable meat, these unique shellfish inspired indigenous artisans, bohemian writers, California cuisine, and the popular sport of skin diving, but also became a highly coveted …
 
Between 1942 and 1945, the United States government forcibly removed approximately 120,000 people "of Japanese ancestry" from their homes and into self-proclaimed concentration camps across the American West and South. At every step in the way, social workers played integral roles in the intricate machinery of racism and bureaucracy that allowed th…
 
Host Elisabeth Braw speaks to Ojars Kalnins, a member of Latvia’s parliament and vice chair of its foreign affairs committee, about Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko’s escalating grayzone aggression against Belarus’s European neighbors. Kalnins, a long-time parliamentarian, previously served as Latvia’s Ambassador to the United States from …
 
It’s been 20 years since the attacks of 9/11. Next month, we’ll mark the 20th anniversary of the arrival of American troops in Afghanistan who toppled the Taliban regime and hunted down Osama bin Laden. Now, as American combat troops leave Afghanistan, we sit down with Craig Whitlock who has pieced together the secret history—warts and all—of Ameri…
 
Teri A. McMurtry-Chubb is the author of Race Unequals: Overseer Contracts, White Masculinities, and the Formation of Managerial Identity in the Plantation Economy, published by Lexington Books in 2021. Race Unequals takes a look at the complex relationship between enslavers and overseers in order to explore the ways in which the “white South” was n…
 
I know that my guest’s feelings about abandoned orphan photos will resonate with you. He hates seeing a photo abandoned and unfortunately he sees a lot of them. It’s a personal mission for Kody Beltz of the Good Finch Company of Witcha, Kansas. He’s an estate and antique dealer. His eventually successful adventure using Facebook to reunite some ide…
 
This week our guest is JAR contributor Chris Coelho. Famed for being a scribe of liberty, Timothy Matlack’s life remains one of the most intriguing of the founding era. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.Dispatches tarafından oluşturuldu
 
She caused a big hubbub in 2018 when she skied down a halfpipe without attempting a single trick, but does she really deserve the title of “con artist”? In this episode, three of the least talented people in the world take a look into Elizabeth Swaney’s controversial Winter Olympics run. Sources: Watch Elizabeth Swaney’s run here: https://www.youtu…
 
Democracy is under attack—in the former Soviet-dominated lands of Eastern Europe, in Turkey, Brazil, India, and yes, even the United States. Tom Nichols urges us not to just look for leaders to whom we can ascribe blame, but to look at ourselves and discern our own role in the weakening of America’s democratic institutions. Nichols is a professor a…
 
How long do you spend working on a photo mystery? It might surprise you to hear that this week’s guest spent more than a decade on her photo problem. The combination of family connections and research can helped her solve several photo problems. Early on in this journey, she asked me to weigh in on her picture. It resulted in an article in Family T…
 
This week our guest is JAR contributor John A. Ruddiman. Long before he became our 5th president, James Monroe served as a young man on the front lines of America’s war for independence. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.Dispatches tarafından oluşturuldu
 
This week Joey leads Adam and Cosmo down a (mechanical) rabbit hole into the dying industry of greyhound racing in the United States. CW: Animal abuse. Sources: Greyhound racing in the US is coming to an end Once One of America’s Favorite Pastimes, Greyhound Racing Eats Dust The History of Greyhound Racing in the United States | Saving Earth | Ency…
 
Southern Food Historian Rebecca Sharpless discusses a new edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking released in 2021 by University of South Carolina Press. Sharpless added a new critical introduction to the historic cookbook, first published in 1930 from a New York press as a collaboration between Blanche Rhett, Helen Woodward, and Lettie …
 
The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) made headlines around the world in 2016. Supporters called the pipeline key to safely transporting American oil from the Bakken oil fields of the northern plains to markets nationwide, essential to both national security and prosperity. Native activists named it the "black snake," referring to an anci…
 
Before 1979, the only way to see the proceedings of Congress was to visit the Capitol. Brian Lamb believed the American public had a right to see government working and convinced the cable industry to create C-SPAN, the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network. After serving in the United States Navy, Lamb worked as a White House staffer and as the W…
 
David Schmalz is a staff writer at the Monterey County Weekly, where his longform pieces have won numerous awards from the California News Publishers Association, including a first place for enterprise reporting in 2014 for an expose he wrote about a local church's attempt to evict residents from 98 federally subsidized apartments from a property i…
 
Home to over 730,000 people, with close to four million people living in the metropolitan area, Seattle has the third-highest homeless population in the United States. In 2018, an estimated 8,600 homeless people lived in the city, a figure that does not include the significant number of "hidden" homeless people doubled up with friends or living in …
 
Every month Maureen does a live Q & A on Facebook and YouTube answering questions submitted by listeners. Have a question? Email her at photodetective@maureentaylor.com This month’s questions: How did Maureen become The Photo Detective? Summertime hazards for photos Disaster planning tips Did snapshots get mounted on card stock? Related Episodes: E…
 
This week our guest is JAR contributor Jordan Baker. The American Revolution was many small wars in one, and the Cherokee-American conflict is a prime example of the many faces of the imperial struggle. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.Dispatches tarafından oluşturuldu
 
Ranching in the West meant more than cowboys and cattle drives, writes Dr. Iker Saitua, and assistant professor of public policy and economic history at the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao, Spain. Dr. Saitua’s new book, Basque Immigrants and Nevada’s Sheep Industry: Geopolitics and the Making of an Agricultural Workforce, 1880-1954 (Univ…
 
More like Loserfer. Sources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-JssjBJKMw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Prl_M4cSWg https://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1096&context=pretrib_arch https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil_in_Christianity https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradise_Lost Adam McShane, Joey Bednarski, and Cosmo Nomikos …
 
Personal conviction and democratic activism often go hand-in-hand. Mohammed Ali Kadivar is both a scholar of democracy and an advocate whose family has long been vocal proponents of it. Kadivar is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and International Studies and director of the Middle East Popular Politics Lab at Boston College. The Middle East Pop…
 
How is it possible for a town to exist where the median household income is about $73,000, but the median home price is about $4,000,000? In Aspen and the American Dream: How One Town Manages Inequality in the Era of Supergentrification (U Chicago Press, 2021), Dr. Jenny Stuber digs into the "impossible" math of Aspen, Colorado by exploring how mid…
 
Their website makes it clear that the eight-person team at Vintage Aerial loves preserving the heritage of rural America and sharing it with anyone and everyone who cares. They’ve built a website of an amazing 18 million images and growing that anyone can access. There are also photo mysteries on the site that you might be able to solve. Identify o…
 
This week our guest is author James DR Philips. The English Revolution changed history, and it’s influence reigns over the American Revolution and the US Constitution. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.Dispatches tarafından oluşturuldu
 
Rice is a central ingredient to Southern foodways, and it is one of the most versatile grains served around the world. It could be prepared as a side dish, an entrée, and dessert; pair it with sugar, cinnamon, and vanilla for a sweet dish or add tomatoes, onions, and peas for a savory meal. In Rice: A Savor the South Cookbook (UNC Press, 2021), Mic…
 
Ian McPherson is a graduate of Campbell University, Saint Louis University, and Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York. They are a passionate advocate for youth leadership both in the church and in the human witness to the world. In today's episode Rachael and Ian explore the intersections of religion and queerness to show how religious…
 
This week the three Smartest Men in the World gather to discuss the little loser that hangs out in our large intestines. Also, Adam sees a racist car. Sources: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/547646/11-facts-about-appendix https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/wellness/1987/03/03/when-the-surgeon-is-his-own-patient/262a41be-c4c9-450c…
 
I had the pleasure of interviewing my mentor, Dr. Michael J. Bustamante on his first monograph, Cuban Memory Wars: Retrospective Politics in Revolution and Exile which was published in March 2021 as part of the Envisioning Cuba series by the University of North Carolina Press. "For many Cubans, Fidel Castro's Revolution represented deliverance from…
 
On more than one occasion, we’ve welcomed guests to this show who engage in “speculative” or “useful” fiction. Elliot Ackerman and Admiral James Stavridis are the latest, their new book, titled 2034, looks at what a war between the United States and China might look like in the not-so-distant future. Admiral James Stavridis is a retired four-star U…
 
Host Elisabeth Braw speaks to Staffan Truvé, co-founder and CTO of Recorded Future, on the threat of Chinese cyber-aggression and espionage and its Digital Silk Road Initiative. They also discuss how liberal democracies and private companies can limit their risk to cyber risks and attacks. Truvé previously served as CEO of the Swedish Institute of …
 
From stamps to envelopes and postcards, my guest’s collecting passions expanded when he bought a few cards at a sale and became fascinated by the postmarks (and messages). He’s an expert on postmarks and using them as a photo clue. We chat about the golden age of postcard printing and the bits of history a postcard can convey including a link to Pr…
 
This week our guest is JAR contributor Edna Gabler. Always present but rarely seen, African Americans played a critical role in determining the outcome of the American Revolution. Through an examination of 18th century artists, many conclusions can be drawn. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.…
 
Comrade KG shows off months of training in long-form narration by re-recording the show's first episode from 2016. Plus an update on the future of the show. Skip to 7:59 to get straight to the content. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/movementspod)The Movements History Podcast tarafından oluşturuldu
 
Leicester Hemingway hunted Nazi submarines, discovered the fountain of youth and created his own micronation by exploiting an archaic law about bird poop. And yet, he’s not as famous as Ernest, is he? Sources: https://sites.utexas.edu/ransomcentermagazine/2015/07/30/throwback-thursday-contents-of-a-country-leicester-hemingways-republic-of-new-atlan…
 
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