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Gardens are more than collections of plants. Gardens and Gardeners are intersectional spaces and agents for positive change in our world. Cultivating Place: Conversations on Natural History and the Human Impulse to Garden is a weekly public radio program & podcast exploring what we mean when we garden. Through thoughtful conversations with growers, gardeners, naturalists, scientists, artists and thinkers, Cultivating Place illustrates the many ways in which gardens are integral to our natura ...
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
The Natural History of Chocolate being a Distinct and Particular Account of the Cocoa-tree, its Growth and Culture, and the Preparation, Excellent Properties, and Medicinal Virtues of its Fruit. Wherein the Errors of those who have wrote upon this Subject are discovered; the Best Way of Making Chocolate is explained; and several Uncommon Medicines drawn from it, are communicated. - Summary by D. de Quelus
 
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and s ...
 
Charley Hesse and Ken Behrens have travelled all over the globe, and accumulated a lifetime worth of adventure stories, in pursuit of wild places and wild creatures. Both are lifelong birding and natural history fanatics, and professional guides. Charley was born in the UK, but has spent his life living in Japan, Ecuador, South Africa, and now Thailand. Ken was born in the US, and has lived in South Africa and Madagascar for the last decade plus. Contact Ken and Charley: ken.behrens@gmail.co ...
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
A weekly conversation about politics and current events, international affairs, history, art, books, and the natural world, to illuminate the issues faced by society and explore them in new ways – presented by Amy Mullins. The intro and outro theme is Soft Illusion and was generously provided by Andras. https://andras.bandcamp.com/track/soft-illusion
 
The Natural Reward podcast will focus on questions of innovation, progress and advancement in the evolution of life. We will discuss the evolution of scientific theories, how to think critically about science, and questions of progress and advancement in technology and human culture. The Natural Reward podcast will cover the philosophy and history of science, evolutionary theory, and economic theory. Music by Christian Bjoerklund.
 
As one of the most watched documentary film series on public television, NATURE delivers the best in original natural history films to audiences nationwide. The Inside NATURE podcast picks up where the film series leaves off. We speak to filmmakers behind some of NATURE’s greatest films, track down updates on animal characters from past episodes, and go beyond the headlines to talk with experts on the frontline of wildlife research and conservation.
 
Cain: A Mystery is Lord Byron's retelling of the classical Biblical story from the point of view of its antagonist. Undoubtedly influenced by Milton's Paradise Lost, Byron's Cain is defiant and questioning. In trying to come to terms with the mortality humanity has been punished with, he comes face to face with Lucifer, who takes him to the "Abyss of Space," shows him a vision of Earth's violent natural history, and gives him a true understanding of death. Upon his return, a devastated Cain ...
 
The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discovery and have witnessed both great triumphs and miserable defeats. As a planetary litmus paper it is at the poles we can detect the effects of natural oscillations and human activities on the global ecosystems.
 
It is seductive to fear the future because we are biologically programmed to look for danger. This natural impulse is enabled by popular media. However, this podcast is meant to awaken a sense of hope for a bright Humalogy™ future. With a more expansive view of the facts, history has proven that humanity constantly progresses. Technology is increasing the speed at which we experience this beneficial progression.
 
Every city has its own horrible history. Each week hosts Emily Barlean and Rachel Everett will venture to two new cities and do a deep dive into a piece of history that you won't read about in the travel brochures – all the horrible, tragic and traumatic things that have happened in the history of the world.
 
If there is a silver lining to be taken from the year 2020, it's that people are opening their eyes to the predicament society has placed itself in. Economic recession, global pandemic, and violence in the streets. Natural disasters, political divisiveness, and food shortages. Like many, you may be apprehensive about the future and have a gut feeling that things aren't quite right, but aren't able to place your finger on why. Breaking Down: Collapse takes the complex ideas surrounding the ul ...
 
A is for Anthropocene: Living in the Age of Humanity is a bi-weekly podcast that digs into the multitude of questions about human impact on our planet. Host Sloan MacRae and Steve Tonsor interview experts in science and the arts to tackle tough issues like climate change and species decline without giving up hope that we can still leave the Earth in excellent condition for generations to come.
 
Natural health, how that relates to mindset, and conversations on spirituality, holistic health, herbalism, mental health, and self healing. If you need solutions to digestive health, sleep, sustainable energy, natural skincare, self love, and self care, this podcast is your new favorite resource. Your host is Emily Ciosek, a health coach certified in Ayurveda, an ancient indian herbal science. Emily has had a rough health history, but healed herself by building strategies to break unhealthy ...
 
Immerse yourself in Canada’s history! Witness to Yesterday episodes take listeners on a journey to document a time in Canada’s past and explore the people behind it, its significance, and its relevance to today. If you like our work, please consider supporting it: https://bit.ly/support_WTY. To learn more about the Society and Canada’s history, subscribe to our newsletter at https://bit.ly/news_WTY.
 
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show series
 
Ernesto Alvarado is a Mexican-born, Southern California-based native plant and seed teacher and student. He is currently the Native Plant Nursery Assistant at the Riverside Corona Resource Conservation District where he specializes in seed and native plants for gardening and greater connection to the world around him – and us.While I told you that …
 
With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osb…
 
As algorithms become ever more significant to and embedded in our everyday lives, ever more accessible introductions to them are needed. While several excellent technical and critical treatments have emerged in recent years, i had not come across a book for the general public that would provide a deep sense for the intuitions and motivations behind…
 
With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osb…
 
Despite Britain's entering the 20th century as the dominant world power, its public discourses were imbued with cultural pessimism and rising social anxiety. Samuel Foster is a Visiting Academic at the University of East Anglia. His first monograph, Yugoslavia in the British Imagination: Peace, War and Peasants before Tito (Bloomsbury, 2021), explo…
 
What is your conscience? Is it, as Peter Cajka asks in this provocative book, “A small, still voice? A cricket perched on your shoulder? An angel and devil who compete for your attention?” Going back at least to the thirteenth century, Catholics viewed their personal conscience as a powerful and meaningful guide to align their conduct with worldly …
 
In this episode I am in conversation with artist and author Vanilla Beer about her 2019 book Stafford Beer: The Father of Management Cybernetics. While he got is start in the academic world, it was in industry where Stafford Beer made is most recognized contributions. Beer is best known for being the first systems thinker to apply cybernetics to ma…
 
As algorithms become ever more significant to and embedded in our everyday lives, ever more accessible introductions to them are needed. While several excellent technical and critical treatments have emerged in recent years, i had not come across a book for the general public that would provide a deep sense for the intuitions and motivations behind…
 
Have you been wondering why your loved ones just won't change their unhealthy habits?Are you trying to decide if you want kids or not?Do you feel like there is negative energy lingering around you sometimes?Are you curious about ancestral healing?In today's episode on Root Awakening: A Health Podcast, we are talking with Ludmila Buitron. Ludmila is…
 
As technology evolves, so does the way we live. The Internet of Things (IoT) is shaping how our lives are lived and what devices are used for everything from cooking to monitoring your health. What does the future of smart sensors & devices look like? What are some examples of what they can do and how will they change our lives? Host Scott Klososky…
 
Ken & Charley have a quick chat about Angola, then introduce an interview that Ken recorded with conservationist Noam Shany while he was there. Check out a Google map of the Angola Birding Route. https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=10p7JmFC2_BU3NdSijU0gyNFXqFt-7xzD&ll=-11.356251760584174%2C14.55156215000003&z=6 Check out some great photos …
 
The local community around the Nat Turner rebellion The 1831 Southampton Rebellion led by Nat Turner involved an entire community. Vanessa M. Holden rediscovers the women and children, free and enslaved, who lived in Southampton County before, during, and after the revolt. Mapping the region's multilayered human geography, Holden draws a fuller pic…
 
Once a powerful figure who reversed the disintegration of China and steered the country to Allied victory in World War II, Chiang Kai-shek fled into exile following his 1949 defeat in the Chinese civil war. As attention pivoted to Mao Zedong’s communist experiment, Chiang was relegated to the dustbin of history. In Chiang Kai-shek’s Politics of Sha…
 
Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book…
 
Over the past seventy years, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM, has evolved from a virtually unknown and little-used pamphlet to an imposing and comprehensive compendium of mental disorder. Its nearly 300 conditions have become the touchstones for the diagnoses that patients receive, students are taught, researchers …
 
FASCISM...FRANCE. Two words/ideas that scholars have spent much time and energy debating in relationship to one another. Chris Millington's A History of Fascism in France: From the First World War to the National Front (Bloomsbury, 2019) is a work of synthesis that also draws on the author's own research for key examples and evidence to support its…
 
Over the past seventy years, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM, has evolved from a virtually unknown and little-used pamphlet to an imposing and comprehensive compendium of mental disorder. Its nearly 300 conditions have become the touchstones for the diagnoses that patients receive, students are taught, researchers …
 
Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book…
 
In his painstakingly researched and splendid new book Sculpting the Self: Islam, Selfhood, and Human Flourishing (U Michigan Press, 2021), Muhammad Faruque charts and examines the multiplicity of ways in which the self and its moral flourishing have been discussed, debated, and examined in the Muslim intellectual tradition. The remarkable aspect of…
 
FASCISM...FRANCE. Two words/ideas that scholars have spent much time and energy debating in relationship to one another. Chris Millington's A History of Fascism in France: From the First World War to the National Front (Bloomsbury, 2019) is a work of synthesis that also draws on the author's own research for key examples and evidence to support its…
 
In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Diana Nemiroff. A former curator of contemporary and modern art at the National Gallery of Art and former director of the Carleton University Art Gallery and an adjunct professor of art history at both Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, she is well placed to write this definitive hi…
 
Political science scholar Claire Jean Kim outlines how COVID-19 came to be racialized and discusses the implications of foregrounding anti-Asian harassment and violence in an anti-Black society. The post How to Frame Asian Suffering in an Anti-Black World: A Conversation with Claire Jean Kim appeared first on Edge Effects.…
 
One would think that comparing civilizations as far removed in time and space as Ancient Egypt and Ancient China might not reveal much. Yet Professor Tony Barbieri’s Ancient Egypt and Early China: State, Society, and Culture (University of Washington Press: 2021) gleans much from a deeply-researched comparison of political structures, diplomatic re…
 
Today we are joined by Petr Roubal, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Contemporary History in the Czech Academy of Sciences, and author of Spartakiads: The Politics of Physical Culture in Communist Czechoslovakia (Karolinum Press/Institute of Contemporary History, 2019). In our conversation, we discussed the genealogy of the Spartakiad gymnasti…
 
Political Mourning: Identity and Responsibility in the Wake of Tragedy (Temple UP, 2021) moves us, as readers, beyond the stages of grief to consider the effects of mourning. While grief consists of the internal thoughts, feelings, and ideas surrounding a loss, the process of mourning transforms grief into an external expression of those interior e…
 
First Emily tells us about the gruesome Icebox Murders in 1965 and shares the possible conspiracies about the killer (did he also kill JFK!?). Then, Rachel heads to medieval times to talk about baaaad bitch, Joanna of Naples . Hopefully, you're horrified. Learn more about Horrible History, contact us and check out our new merch store at: www.horrib…
 
The Orca (Orcinus orca) is one of the most famous animals on the planet - but there is some very unusual and kind of mysterious stuff going on with orcas, and a lot of it may be connected to their astonishing predatory abilities ... Subscribe to the show to make sure you don't miss any future Wild Episodes, and e-mail your comments, corrections, su…
 
What claims could Jewish veterans make on the Nazi state by virtue of their having fought for Germany? How often did Germans treat Jewish veterans differently from Jewish men without military experience during the Weimar and Nazi periods? How did perceptions of masculinity and of Germanness intersect to shape attitudes and behaviors of Jewish veter…
 
Western Jihadism: A Thirty Year History (Oxford University Press, 2021) tells the story of how Al Qaeda grew in the West. In forensic and compelling detail, Jytte Klausen traces how Islamist revolutionaries exiled in Europe and North America in the 1990s helped create and control one of the world's most impactful terrorist movements--and how, after…
 
This podcast interviews Kusumita Pedersen on the first book-length study of the thought of Sri Chinmoy (1931-2007) and his teaching of a dynamic spirituality of integral transformation. The Philosophy of Sri Chinmoy: Love and Transformation (Lexington, 2021) is a straightforward and unembroidered account of his philosophy, allowing Sri Chinmoy to s…
 
Albeit inspired by a progressive vision of a working environment without walls or hierarchies, the open plan office has come to be associated with some of the most dehumanizing and alienating aspects of the modern office. Jennifer Kaufman-Buhler's fascinating new book Open Plan: A Design History of the American Office (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines th…
 
Rakugo, a popular form of comic storytelling, has played a major role in Japanese culture and society. Developed during the Edo (1600–1868) and Meiji (1868–1912) periods, it is still popular today, with many contemporary Japanese comedians having originally trained as rakugo artists. Rakugo is divided into two distinct strands, the Tokyo tradition …
 
Many parts of the world live in areas heavily impacted by tropical cyclones. Costing 10's and even 100's of billions of dollars per year in damages, these storms have the potential to cause real harm to supply chaines, infrastructure, and economy. Thanks to climate change, they're getting worse. Learn More: Projected Increases in Hurricane Damage i…
 
South Side Chicago Still think of him often… so today we’re talking bout Willie ‘Wimp’ Stokes and his Cadillac Coffin. This week’s Patreon only episode is on Idi Amin and the Enfundu. For just $2 US a month you can support the show, and get access to exclusive content. The blog post of the episode is here. Check out the blog at historyandimaginatio…
 
Shawn Wilhite is author of this outstanding new commentary on one of the most important early Christian documents. We don't know who wrote the Didache, when it was written, or who it was written for, but Wilhite's work demonstrates how the text sets out teaching about ethics, sacraments and eschatology that seemed so authoritative that some readers…
 
The Bible is not only a book but also a collection of books. It has many authors but also at the same time many editors. It has not only been translated from one language to another but also translated with different doctrinal and methodological frameworks. It is not only a product of history but also a product of conglomeration of cultures, religi…
 
Robinson Woodward-Burns is the author of Hidden Laws: How the State Constitutions Stabilize American Politics, published by Yale University Press in 2021. Hidden Laws explores the relationship between both state and national constitutional development, debates, and reform. A sprawling study of American constitutional history, Woodward-Burns’s book …
 
Diplomatic relationships between Indigenous sovereigns and colonial and settler governments were defined by language. In some cases, cultural divides were narrowed using common metaphors. In others, objects such as wampum belts were employed as visual records of past agreements. Speeches were carefully recorded, copied, and cited in later negotiati…
 
Actuarial thinking is everywhere in contemporary America, an often unnoticed byproduct of the postwar insurance industry’s political and economic influence. Calculations of risk permeate our institutions, influencing how we understand and manage crime, education, medicine, finance, and other social issues. In Insurance Era: Risk, Governance, and th…
 
Today’s episode features stories from Florida and Vegas! Reasons to Listen this Week: A real-life version of The Hangover Disruptive pancakes An $8000 bar tab A man tazered for twerking A peeing pastor And a Florida woman free to fart where she wants Contact Us: Instagram: @horriblehistorypod Twitter: @thehorriblepod Email: horriblehistorypodcast@g…
 
Watch this on video | Buy us a coffee: Chris / Henry / Mario POLAR NEWSREELProtection of marine wildlife can result in conflicts with small scale fishing communities. // Protection of marine wildlife can give healthier ecosystems and increased carbon capture by the ocean: meet the sea otter. // More whales equals more carbon storage. // After the d…
 
Humanity has tackled a lot of hard problems over the last few thousand years--from medicine to physics to splitting tips. But the most difficult question we've ever answered is our subject this week: where are we? Continue your education via University of California Irvine now! Check out this show and all your other podcasts on Vodacast. Get a free…
 
Natural carbonation occurs when yeast metabolize sugars and produce CO2 as a byproduct. In this episode, contributor Cade Jobe joins Marshall to talk about the use of both sucrose (table sugar) and honey as a priming sugar for carbonating beer. The Brülosophy Podcast is brought to you by Imperial Yeast who provide brewers with the most viable and f…
 
The Clergy in Early Modern Scotland (Boydell Press, 2021), edited by Chris R. Langley, Catherine E. McMillan and Russell Newton, is an outstanding and agenda-setting volume that puts the experience of Reformed ministers at the centre of the religious history of early modern Scotland. Long confined to the historiographical margins, ministers have be…
 
Pants on Fire: On Lying in Politics is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and renowned intellectual historian Martin Jay, UC Berkeley. A thought-provoking book in dialogue format examining Martin Jay’s extensive research on lying in politics from Plato and St. Augustine to Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss which culminated i…
 
Pants on Fire: On Lying in Politics is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and renowned intellectual historian Martin Jay, UC Berkeley. A thought-provoking book in dialogue format examining Martin Jay’s extensive research on lying in politics from Plato and St. Augustine to Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss which culminated i…
 
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