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World War I was one of the most savage and brutal wars in human history. There were millions of deaths and the tragedy was compounded by the fact that these were all young men in the flower of youth. Both sides suffered heavy losses and this war is also notable for being one in which many new and terrible weapons were introduced by both to slaughter each other. Gallipoli Diary by John Graham Gillam is one of the many personal narratives written by survivors of this bloody conflict. Published ...
 
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Sarah Midford (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on the portrayal of Gallipoli and ANZACs in films and television. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.…
 
Sarah Midford (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on the legacy of the Gallipoli campaign, and the fine line between commemoration and celebration. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights rese…
 
Professor Robin Prior (History, Flinders University) on the Gallipoli campaign, Australia’s contribution on the battlefield, and the growth of myth. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Co…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Before dawn on the 25th of April 1915, 4000 Australian soldiers rowed towards the shores of Gallipoli. By nightfall, 600 men had lost their lives. Their stories should never be forgotten. Every day, you can listen to a new spoken-word letter that was written 100 years ago, to the day. You’ll be right there in the trenches as the letters were writte…
 
Dr Michelle Negus-Cleary (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on life on the Gallipoli battlefield and the conditions the soldiers were living with, such as poor food and supplies, illness and traumatic stress. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au…
 
Dr Bart Ziino (History, Deakin University) on the concept of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and how they represent the fallen of World War I who never returned. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all right…
 
Dr Jessie Birkett Rees (Archaeology, La Trobe University) on archaeological studies of the battlefield on the Gallipoli peninsula, and the challenges of working in such an environment. Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.Dr Jessie Birkett Rees tarafından oluşturuldu
 
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