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Think Like an Economist and you’ll see the world more clearly, empowering you to make better decisions at work, at home, and in your community. Leading economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers will take you on a joyous romp through their field as they introduce you to the big ideas in economics, and show how you can apply them to live in your own life. Their signature approach reveals that every decision is an economic decision and this podcast uncovers the economic forces that shape t ...
 
Delivered before breakfast, The Economist Morning Briefing tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full Economist Morning Briefing: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://briefing.economist.com for access to the full ...
 
Este é o Economisto, o novo podcast de economia e políticas públicas do IDP. Economia e outras áreas do conhecimento se misturam em debates sobre o tempo em que vivemos. O professor Pedro Fernando Nery conversa com economistas, juristas, e profissionais de diversos campos. Na primeira temporada, o tema é desigualdade. Acadêmicos, juristas e formadores de opinião conversam sobre como construir um País mais justo. Estamos disponíveis nos principais agregadores de Podcast, e também no site de P ...
 
Economist and scholar Beth Akers seeks to inform aspiring students about how to make strategic decisions about their higher education. Speaking on topics like how to use data to shop for college or non-college alternatives, how to utilize the student loan system to your advantage, and more, Beth cuts through the romanticism we often attach to college decision making and teaches listeners how to make decisions that are grounded in data and fact.
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic.
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
For over 175 years, The Economist has provided fair, rigorous, and mind-stretching analysis for a globally curious audience. This podcast, from The Economist Intelligence Unit, builds on that legacy by providing perspectives for industry and management to understand how the world is changing, and how that creates opportunities to be seized, and risks to be managed. Each episode will draw on the expertise of our editors, and other thought leaders to examine insights from our global programmes ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
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How has the pursuit of love changed? Anne McElvoy asks the British actress, screenwriter and director of the TV adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s novel "The Pursuit of Love" about the choice women face between heady freedoms and a more settled life through the generations. Should period dramas be more diverse? And, which Russian classic would she adapt…
 
Technological change is upending finance as the clout of payment platforms and tech firms grows and central banks begin to issue their own digital currencies. But can you imagine a world without banks? Rachana Shanbhogue explores the future of banking with Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s Wall Street correspondent, Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase,…
 
Cutting-edge semiconductors are the most complex objects that humans make. Host Hal Hodson and Tim Cross, The Economist’s technology editor, delve into the secretive science that powers a growing portion of economic activity and the world-leading yet precarious work of TSMC—the company that dominates chipmaking. The pandemic has exposed vulnerabili…
 
It's time to explore macroeconomics from a new yet familiar perspective, using economy-wide supply and demand curves to forecast the economy's total output and average price level. Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers show you how this perspective can help you diagnose the economy's ills, and prescribe the appropriate policy medicine. Summary Co-hos…
 
Thousands are dying each day amid vaccine shortages. Would a patent waiver save lives? Jayati Ghosh of the University of Massachusetts Amherst says liberating IP is an urgent moral issue. Richard Hatchett, CEO at CEPI, disagrees. Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, our deputy editor, and economics columnist Ryan Avent. For full ac…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the rise of e-money, ten years after Spain’s indignados protests (10:03) and “the brothers Karamazov” on stage (17:36). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast…
 
In this episode, senior editor Jason Wincuinas speaks to Rohit Sahgal, EIU's principal for global health in Asia about the sustainability of healthcare ecosystems. Get more perspectives from our healthcare and sustainability coverage. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
We are not born good. The Christian Worldview explains how fallen people are called to redeem the world by increasing consumer surplus for their neighbors. #78 Are we Born Good? Chloe Zhao, received the Oscar for best director for her film Nomadland. Ms Zhao, who moved to the U.S. when she was in…The Christian Economist by Dave Arnott tarafından oluşturuldu
 
In this episode, Beth speaks with Douglas Webber, a professor of economics at Temple University, about the risks associated with picking and paying for college, which factors (i.e. major, institution, etc) matter most when it comes to your degree paying off, and advice for aspiring students on how to mitigate risk.…
 
Governments’ efforts to move their services and operations online have been accelerated by the pandemic. Host Tom Standage finds out which countries are leading the way, and which are lagging behind. What are the barriers that must be overcome, and where is e-government heading next? Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and …
 
An interview with Rob Affleck, Innovation Engagement Manager and start-up funding expert at Woodside Energy. Tune in to understand how to value the stock market and what you need to consider before investing in start-ups, index funds, singular companies, cryptocurrencies and commodities.Alexandra tarafından oluşturuldu
 
This episode of features guest expert Professor Alicia L. Rihn of the University of Tennessee's Institute of Agriculture and her research into what consumers want and what they are willing to pay for. Consumer demographics as well as regional influences impact what consumers are looking for from producers and what they will pay for it. Alicia's bac…
 
How has the pursuit of love changed? Anne McElvoy asks the British actress, screenwriter and director of the TV adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s novel "The Pursuit of Love" about the choice women face between heady freedoms and a more settled life through the generations. Should period dramas be more diverse? And, which Russian classic would she adapt…
 
Liz Cheney had been a rising Republican star. Now the staunch conservative has been purged by her own party. Her removal shows that, even in defeat, Donald Trump retains an iron grip on the Republicans. Denmark has taken in thousands of Syrian refugees over the past decade, but its welcome has waned. The Danish government says that Damascus is safe…
 
Technological change is upending finance as the clout of payment platforms and tech firms grows and central banks begin to issue their own digital currencies. But can you imagine a world without banks? Rachana Shanbhogue explores the future of banking with Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s Wall Street correspondent, Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase,…
 
In the seventh installment of the Political Economists Podcast, Max and Jorrel breakdown Thorstein Veblen's Theory of the Leisure Class. To those unfamiliar with Veblen, the leisure class refers to the top social class that can engage in leisure openly and conspicuously. Join the two as they explain how the leisure class, modern day clout, and tax …
 
China just unveiled the results of its first census in over a decade. The results are striking, if not surprising: the world’s largest country will soon stop growing. Yet if a greying population causes economic headwinds, Chinese officials also have reason for cheer. With digital currencies in vogue, central banks want to get in on the action. The …
 
Cutting-edge semiconductors are the most complex objects that humans make. Host Hal Hodson and Tim Cross, The Economist’s technology editor, delve into the secretive science that powers a growing portion of economic activity and the world-leading yet precarious work of TSMC—the company that dominates chipmaking. The pandemic has exposed vulnerabili…
 
Tension in the holy city of Jerusalem has been rising for weeks, amid the attempted eviction of Palestinians and a march by Jewish nationalists. Yesterday it erupted into the worst violence in years, as Hamas rockets fired at Israel from Gaza prompted retaliatory air strikes. A cyber-attack that shut down one of America’s largest fuel pipelines ref…
 
Thousands are dying each day amid vaccine shortages. Would a patent waiver save lives? Jayati Ghosh of the University of Massachusetts Amherst says liberating IP is an urgent moral issue. Richard Hatchett, CEO at CEPI, disagrees. Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, our deputy editor, and economics columnist Ryan Avent. For full ac…
 
Boris Johnson, Britain’s prime minister, is celebrating a wave of election victories for his Conservative Party in the north of England. But in Scotland, pro-independence parties continue to dominate. Judges in Germany have demanded that the government take a more radical approach to climate change; their ruling could shake up climate policy around…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the rise of e-money, ten years after Spain’s indignados protests (10:03) and “the brothers Karamazov” on stage (17:36). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast…
 
Big-city homicide rates have spiked during the pandemic. St Louis has America’s highest murder rate and nearly two thirds go unsolved. What happens when so many cases are left cold? Sharon Williams’ son Mikey was shot and killed. His case remains unsolved. The Economist’s US digital editor Jon Fasman went to St Louis to speak to her. John Prideaux …
 
Demonstrations initially against tax reform have bloomed—and turned violent. The reforms have been shelved, but the protests now threaten President Iván Duque’s rule. The emissions contributions of the world’s armed forces are rarely reported and largely overlooked; we examine the efforts to make armies a bit greener. And an audio tour through popu…
 
The Senator for Minnesota, former Democratic presidential candidate, and author of "Antitrust" talks to Anne McElvoy about whether America's mega-companies should be broken up. Also, will the Apple v Epic Games case increase competition and were Facebook’s Oversight Board right to uphold the suspension of Trump’s account. And are female politicians…
 
The Senator for Minnesota, former Democratic presidential candidate, and author of "Antitrust" talks to Anne McElvoy about whether America's mega-companies should be broken up. Also, will the Apple v Epic Games case increase competition and were Facebook’s Oversight Board right to uphold the suspension of Trump’s account. And are female politicians…
 
The social-media giant’s external-review body upheld a ban on former president Donald Trump—for now. We ask how a narrow ruling reflects on far broader questions of free speech and regulation. America’s young offenders are often handed long sentences and face disproportionate harms; we examine reforms that are slowly taking hold. And the Broadway m…
 
Now that the world’s most celebrated investor has named a successor, the conglomerate he created must face some hard truths. Also, as companies wrestle with thorny issues from climate change to voting rights, economist Dambisa Moyo argues corporate boards need a makeover. And, the pandemic has coaxed millions of older people online—now companies ar…
 
Now that the world’s most celebrated investor has named a successor, the conglomerate he created must face some hard truths. Also, as companies wrestle with thorny issues from climate change to voting rights, economist Dambisa Moyo argues corporate boards need a makeover. And, the pandemic has coaxed millions of older people online—now companies ar…
 
Today another state will enact a “permitless carry” law—no licence, checks or training required. We ask why states’ loosening of safeguards fails to reflect public sentiment. Brexit has supercharged Scottish nationalism, and this week’s elections may pave the way to another independence referendum. And a long-forgotten coffee species may weather th…
 
China recently launched the first module of its new space station—what impact will this have on the international scientific community? Also, how orbiting telescopes could be useful in understanding cancer. And when solving problems, why do people prefer to innovate by adding things rather than getting rid of them? Kenneth Cukier hosts For full acc…
 
China recently launched the first module of its new space station—what impact will this have on the international scientific community? Also, how orbiting telescopes could be useful in understanding cancer. And when solving problems, why do people prefer to innovate by adding things rather than getting rid of them? Kenneth Cukier hosts For full acc…
 
A decades-old policy of “strategic ambiguity” is breaking down; we ask about the risks and the stakes of a potential Chinese bid to take Taiwan by force. The number of diseases jumping from animals to humans is set to keep rising; we look at why, and how to make the jump rarer. And the misguided mission to understand canine communication. For full …
 
Government deficits and debt are at record levels in many countries, provoking widespread anxiety. Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers explain why governments run deficits and rack up debt, whether they're likely to be sustainable, and if you really need to worry. Co-host: Nastaran Tavakoli-Far. Editor: Alastair Elphick. A Modulated Media productio…
 
Vaccines have become a tool of global influence. China and Russia have sent millions of doses abroad, but the West has lagged in vaccine diplomacy. What are the risks and rewards? Agathe Demarais of The Economist Intelligence Unit, who wrote a report on the subject, tells The Jab how China and Russia’s vaccine diplomacy could backfire. Alok Jha and…
 
Vaccines have become a tool of global influence. China and Russia have sent millions of doses abroad, but the West has lagged in vaccine diplomacy. What are the risks and rewards? Agathe Demarais of The Economist Intelligence Unit, who wrote a report on the subject, tells The Jab how China and Russia’s vaccine diplomacy could backfire. Alok Jha and…
 
The province’s largest party aligned with Britain has lost its leader; in the 100 years since the island was split it has rarely seemed so close to reuniting. Diplomacy, as with so much else, had to go online during the pandemic—and emerged more efficient and inclusive than many expected. And how art-lovers are getting ever more fully immersed. For…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Taiwan: the most dangerous place on earth, post-covid syndrome (09:00) and Buttonwood: private-credit markets (28:55) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.c…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Taiwan: the most dangerous place on earth, post-covid syndrome (09:00) and Buttonwood: private-credit markets (28:55) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.c…
 
Jenny wollte 25.000 Euro an der Börse investieren und hat mit einem Schlag alles verloren. Jetzt hat sie 344.000 Euro Schulden bei ihrer Bank – unbezahlbar für die junge Mutter. Welchen Fehler sie gemacht hat, hört Ihr in dieser Economista-Folge. Finanzprofessorin Christine Laudenbach erklärt Euch, was Privatanleger machen müssen, um nicht in diese…
 
Nesse episódio conversamos com Livia Gouvea sobre os efeitos da pandemia sobre o mercado de trabalho feminino. A Livia nos falou sobre perspectivas do teletrabalho, desigualdades de gênero no mercado de trabalho como promotoras de ineficiência, disperdiçando talentos. Ela também comentou sobre a importância em distinguirmos empreendedorismo feminin…
 
A portrait of Franklin Roosevelt hangs in the Oval Office, where Joe Biden convenes historians to share how his hero began changing the country in his very first weeks as president. But the new president faces tough trade-offs to secure his ambitious agenda. How much might this presidency transform America? Historian Niall Ferguson tells us preside…
 
Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s proudly “illiberal democracy” has nobbled nearly every institution. Now that his ruling party will run the higher-education system, expect a propaganda blitz. We examine research that points toward a long-sought blood test for clinical depression—one that would identify targeted treatments. And remembering Native Ameri…
 
In 2004 Tammy Duckworth was shot down by Iraqi insurgents while she was serving in the army and lost both legs in the attack. As America withdraws troops from Afghanistan, Anne McElvoy asks the Illinois senator about the legacy of America's interventions abroad and whether President Biden is making the right decision. The first Thai-American woman …
 
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