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When did the word “robot” enter the English language? When did the famous Sears catalogue finally bid us all adieu? On ‘This Week in Business History,’ host Scott Luton connects the dots as he leads us down memory lane, shining a light on some of the most significant leaders, companies, innovations – and even lessons learned – from our collective business history. Tune in for some of the most relevant business and global supply chain events from years past. You never know when the events of ...
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TBH explores how tech businesses got started, how they succeeded or failed and what it was like to work in them. Presenter Charles Miller is a former BBC producer who specialised in documentaries about technology and business. In TBH he continues his research, meeting key people whose stories tell us how technology found its way into our lives. In this first series, he talks to those behind the dot com boom and bust in the UK in the late 1990s.
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Old School Meets New School! Somewhat recently, the Oracle of Omaha Warren Buffett was forced to finally admit that he was not well-connected to the tech boom to fully profit from that once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. He just didn't get it. Many of the discussions relative to current day economics, business, history, cryptocurrency are quite often constrained by the perspectives of the participants. Younger participants are more attuned to the world into which they have grown and are now curr ...
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Old School Meets New School! Somewhat recently, the Oracle of Omaha Warren Buffett was forced to finally admit that he was not well-connected to the tech boom to fully profit from that once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. He just didn't get it. Many of the discussions relative to current day economics, business, history, cryptocurrency are quite often constrained by the perspectives of the participants. Younger participants are more attuned to the world into which they have grown and are now curr ...
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Vintage House on WNUR is the premiere on-air radio show and podcast dedicated to illuminating and preserving the lives, music, and careers of #HouseMusic legends. Join us Every Wednesday on WNUR.org 89.3 or Stream. Powered by the Modern Dance Music Research and Archiving Foundation - www.DanceMusicFoundation.org is the ONLY repository in the United States dedicated solely to the study, preservation and celebration of the House and Dance Music Genres. Hosted by House Music Pioneers DJ Lori Br ...
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A show about sneakers for sneakerheads, by sneakerheads. We're not here to bring people down or play gatekeeper, we are here to show the positive side of sneakers and connect with like-minded sneakerheads. We talk about sneakers and the footwear industry, interview footwear industry professionals, designers, and creatives that share our passion for sneakers. Opinions not paid for by the corporate sponsors like the other guys. Hosted by... Nick Engvall, Footwear Consultant and former StockX D ...
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Ancient Solutions. Modern Consequences. Join three business geeks and history junkies as they explore the twisty and unexpected history of business. From midwives in Colonial America to percussion manufacturers in modern Japan, from KFC to African empires, and from the Epic of Gilgamesh to modern irrigation systems in Peru — we’ll explore together how ancient solutions have modern consequences for anyone willing to see them. Join your hosts: Dr. Frank E. Hutchison, CQM/OE; Meredith Hutchison ...
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show series
 
China’s modern history has been marked by deep spatial inequalities between regions, between cities, and between rural and urban areas. Contemporary observers and historians alike have attributed these inequalities to distinct stages of China's political economy: the dualistic economy of semicolonialism, rural-urban divisions in the socialist perio…
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In this episode Rohit and our special guest host from our Discord Community talk with the most famous sneakerheads in wrestling, The Young Bucks of the AEW. Support The Show: https://venmo.com/sneakerhistory Join Our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/xJFyWmWgza Early Access and Exclusive Videos On Patreon: https://patreon.com/sneakerhistory Sub…
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The Chosen Few Picnic was FIRE this year and Chosen Few DJ's member Alan King oversees the show, plans the party and ensures that each festival is THE BEST for each performer, sponsors and every participant from the dancers to the tents!! Learn more about the festival, his time at the Sidecar club and how Frankie Knuckles impacted his music career.…
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Join our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/xJFyWmWgza Early Access and Exclusive Videos On Patreon: https://patreon.com/sneakerhistory Subscribe on YouTube: https://youtube.com/sneakerhistory —–––– Check out our other shows: —–––– For the Formula 1 Fans --> Exhaust Notes: https://exhaustnotes.fm For the Fitted Hat Fans --> Crown and Stitch: htt…
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A new book reveals an incredible slice of Cuban-American history that’s been all but forgotten until now. Lisandro Perez‘s Sugar, Cigars and Revolution: The Making of Cuban New York (NYU Press, 2018) tells the story of a vibrant Cuban émigré community in 19th-century New York that ranged from wealthy sugar plantation owners investing their fortunes…
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Over the past 300 years, The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce has tried to improve British life in every way imaginable. It has sought to influence education, commerce, music, art, architecture, communications, food, and every other corner of society. Arts and Minds: How the Royal Society of Arts Changed a Nati…
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The struggle against neoliberal order has gained momentum over the last five decades – to the point that economic elites have not only adapted to the Left's critiques but incorporated them for capitalist expansion. Venture funds expose their ties to slavery and pledge to invest in racial equity. Banks pitch microloans as a path to indigenous self-d…
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In Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy (Simon & Schuster, 2019), Matt Stoller explains how authoritarianism and populism have returned to American politics for the first time in eighty years, as the outcome of the 2016 election shook our faith in democratic institutions. It has brought to the fore dangerous forces that ma…
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Original and deeply researched, The Slow Death of Slavery in Dutch New York: A Cultural, Economic, and Demographic History, 1700-1827 (Cambridge University Press, 2024) provides a new interpretation of Dutch American slavery which challenges many of the traditional assumptions about slavery in New York. With an emphasis on demography and economics,…
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A new kind of city park has emerged in the early twenty-first century. Postindustrial parks transform the derelict remnants of an urban past into distinctive public spaces that meld repurposed infrastructure, wild-looking green space, and landscape architecture. For their proponents, they present an opportunity to turn disused areas into neighborho…
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Today’s book is: Freeman’s Challenge: The Murder That Shook America’s Original Prison for Profit (U Chicago Press, 2024), by Dr. Robin Bernstein, which tells the story of a teenager named William Freeman. Convicted of a horse theft he insisted he did not commit, he was sentenced to five years of hard labor in Auburn’s new prison. Uniting incarcerat…
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Examining the changing character of revolution around the world, The Revolutionary City: Urbanization and the Global Transformation of Rebellion (Princeton UP, 2022) focuses on the impact that the concentration of people, power, and wealth in cities exercises on revolutionary processes and outcomes. Once predominantly an urban and armed affair, rev…
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The 'baby boom' generation, born between the 1940s and the 1960s, is often credited with pioneering new and creative ways of relating, doing intimacy and making families. With this cohort now entering mid and later life in Britain, they are also said to be revolutionising the experience of ageing. Are the romantic practices of this 'revolutionary c…
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San Francisco began its American life as a city largely made up of transient men, arriving from afar to participate in the gold rush and various attendant enterprises. This large population of men on the move made the new and booming city a hub of what "respectable" easterners considered vice: drinking, gambling, and sex work, among other activitie…
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Thank you for supporting the show. You can support through either of the links below: Venmo: https://venmo.com/u/sneakerhistory Buy Me A Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nickengvall This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Spotify Ad Analytics - https://www.spotify.com/us/legal/ad-analytics-privacy-policy/…
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All too often, the history of early modern Africa is told from the perspective of outsiders. In his book A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Toby Green draws upon a range of underutilized sources to describe the evolution of West Africa over a period of four…
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In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic Power (Princeton University Press, 2019), highli…
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In Worthy of Freedom: Indenture and Free Labor in the Era of Emancipation (University of Chicago Press, 2024), Jonathan Connolly traces the normalization of indenture from its controversial beginnings to its widespread adoption across the British Empire during the nineteenth century. Initially viewed as a covert revival of slavery, indenture caused…
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The rise of agrarian capitalism in Britain is usually told as a story about markets, land and wages. The Enclosure of Knowledge: Books, Power and Agrarian Capitalism in Britain, 1660–1800 (Cambridge University Press, 2022) by Dr. James Fisher reveals that it was also about books, knowledge and expertise. It argues that during the early modern perio…
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Locusts of Power: Borders, Empire, and Environment in the Modern Middle East (Cambridge UP, 2023) focuses on the intersections of three entities otherwise deemed marginal in historical scholarship: the Jazira region, the borderlands of today’s Iraq, Syria, and Turkey; the mobile peoples within this region, from nomadic pastoralists to deportees and…
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A history of food in the Crescent City that explores race, power, social status, and labor. In Insatiable City: Food and Race in New Orleans (U Chicago Press, 2024), Theresa McCulla probes the overt and covert ways that the production of food and the discourse about it both created and reinforced many strains of inequality in New Orleans, a city si…
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This episode features a conversation with Dr. William Gow on his recently published book, Performing Chinatown: Hollywood, Tourism, and the Making of a Chinese American Community (Stanford University Press, 2024), focuses on the 1930s and 1940s Los Angeles–its Chinatowns, and “city,” as well as the Chinese American community’s relationship with Hol…
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The emergence of the popular music industry in the early twentieth century not only drove a wedge between music production and consumption, it also underscored a wider separation of labor from leisure and of the workplace from the domestic sphere. These were changes characteristic of an industrial society where pleasure was to be sought outside of …
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Traversed by thousands of trains and millions of riders, the Northeast Corridor might be America’s most famous railway, but its influence goes far beyond the right-of-way. Dr. David Alff welcomes readers aboard to see how nineteenth-century train tracks did more than connect Boston to Washington, DC. They transformed hundreds of miles of Atlantic s…
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When Americans and other citizens of advanced capitalist countries think of humanitarianism, they think of charitable efforts to help people displaced by war, disaster, and oppression find new homes where they can live complete lives. However, as the historian Laura Robson argues in her book Human Capital: A History of Putting Refugees to Work (Ver…
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In this episode of the Sneaker History Podcast, Mike interviews the Sole Brothers, Flexx Luthor and Morgan's Sneaker Room. They discuss their TikTok fame, their chemistry as co-hosts, and their sneaker collections. The conversation segues into a discussion about the sneakers they are currently rocking and copping. They also talk about their love fo…
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There were 20,000 miles of railways in 1865 and about a million by 2020. Scale has always been a key theme in railway history. In the First World War, the London and North West Railway transported 325,000 miles of barbed wire and over twelve million pairs of army boots. At the end of the twentieth century, Indian Railways sold 4.5 billion tickets a…
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Despite a mass expansion of the higher education sector in the UK since the 1960s, young people from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds remain less likely to enter university than their advantaged counterparts. Drawing on unique new research gathered from three contrasting secondary schools in England, including interviews with children f…
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Half a century ago, deindustrialization gutted blue-collar jobs in the American Midwest. But today, these places are not ghost towns. People still call these communities home, even as they struggle with unemployment, poverty, and other social and economic crises. Why do people remain in declining areas through difficult circumstances? What do their…
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Do we understand racism as the primary driving engine of American inequality? Or do we focus instead on the indirect ways that frequently hard-to-discern class inequality and inegalitarian power relations can produce racially differentiated outcomes? Adaner Usmani, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Studies at Harvard and on the editorial …
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Daniel Susskind examines the brief and powerful history of economic growth and puts it into perspective with human prosperity in Growth: A History and a Reckoning (Harvard UP, 2024). Susskind acknowledges the tremendous benefits of economic growth, which he credits with freeing billions of people from poverty and allowing us to live longer and heal…
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Today, the mention of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego conjures images of idyllic landscapes untouched by globalisation. Creatures of Fashion: Animals, Global Markets, and the Transformation of Patagonia (University of North Carolina Press, 2024) by Dr. John Soluri upends this, revealing how the exploitation of animals—terrestrial and marine, domesti…
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In this episode, I talk to Samuel Dolbee, Assistant Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. His book, Locusts of Power: Borders, Empire, and Environment in the Modern Middle East (Cambridge University Press, 2023). In this highly original environmental history, Samuel Dolbee sheds new light on borders and state formation by following locusts…
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Childhood as lived during the French Third Republic was very different from childhood during the modern era. Working-class children laboured alongside adults in the home, on the streets, and in places of work. French authorities sought to change this and redefine childhood by means of government organizations, separate legal structures, and schools…
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It's that time of year. On this episode of the Sneaker History Podcast. Mike, Robbie, and Nick discuss the best sneakers of 2024 so far. Join our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/xJFyWmWgza Support the Pod: https://patreon.com/sneakerhistory Subscribe on YouTube: https://youtube.com/sneakerhistory —–––– Check out our other shows: —–––– For the…
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What exactly is capitalism? How has the meaning of capitalism changed over time? And what’s at stake in our understanding or misunderstanding of it? In Capitalism: The Story Behind the Word (Princeton UP, 2022), Michael Sonenscher examines the history behind the concept and pieces together the range of subjects bound up with the word. Sonenscher sh…
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Building a Nation at War: Building a Nation at War: Transnational Knowledge Networks and the Development of China during and after World War II (Harvard UP, 2022) argues that the Chinese Nationalist government’s retreat inland during the Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945), its consequent need for inland resources, and its participation in new scientific…
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Simon Heffer's book Sing As We Go: Britain Between the Wars (Penguin, 2024) is an astonishingly ambitious overview of the political, social and cultural history of the country from 1919 to 1939. It explores and explains the politics of the period, and puts such moments of national turmoil as the General Strike of 1926 and the Abdication Crisis of 1…
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Tribe-Class Linkages: The History and Politics of the Agrarian Movement in Tripura (Routledge, 2023) is a historical study of the development of agrarian class relations among the tribal population in Tripura. Tracing the evolution of Tripura and its agrarian relations from monarchy in the nineteenth century to democracy in the twentieth century, t…
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A political history of the rise and fall of American debt relief. Americans have a long history with debt. They also have a long history of mobilizing for debt relief. Throughout the nineteenth century, indebted citizens demanded government protection from their financial burdens, challenging readings of the Constitution that exalted property right…
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In this episode of the Sneaker History Podcast, Rohit and Mike discuss their current pop culture obsessions and recent sneaker pickups. They also talk about the Nike Air Jordan RM Nigel Sylvester and the upcoming releases of Kobe and Jordan sneakers. The conversation touches on the storytelling behind the sneakers and the crossover between traditio…
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Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel, talks to Trish Kahle, Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University-Qatar, about Kahle's new project, "Power Up: A Social History of American Electricity," which focuses especially on the labor history of both constructing and maintaining the electricity grid. They also talk about Kahle's forthcoming boo…
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A probing examination of the dynamic history of predictive methods and values in science and engineering that helps us better understand today's cultures of prediction. The ability to make reliable predictions based on robust and replicable methods is a defining feature of the scientific endeavor, allowing engineers to determine whether a building …
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Electronic Dance Music: From Deviant Subculture to Culture Industry (Rowman & Littlefield, 2023) explores the subculture’s emergence as a deviant subculture. This text analyzes how industry professionals, fans, and public officials helped usher in a new age of EDM, arguing that while the defining features of the subculture made it attractive, they …
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Sino-Italian Political and Economic Relations: From the Treaty of Friendship to the Second World War (Routledge, 2024) presents a comprehensive narrative and historical analysis of the political and economic relations between China and Italy from the Treaty of Friendship and Commerce signed in October 1866 to the Second World War. Utilizing primary…
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From the 1960s through the 1990s, the most common job for women in the United States was clerical work. Even as college-educated women obtained greater opportunities for career advancement, occupational segregation by gender remained entrenched. How did feminism in corporate America come to represent the individual success of the executive woman an…
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In The Soviet Union and the Construction of the Global Market. Energy and the Ascent of Finance in Cold War Europe, 1964–1971 (Cambridge University Press, 2023), Oscar Sanchez-Sibony reveals the origins of our current era in the dissolution of the institutions that governed the architecture of energy and finance during the Bretton Woods era. He sho…
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Linked by declarations of emancipation within the same five-year period, two countries shared human rights issues on two distinct continents. In When Emancipation Came: The End of Enslavement on a Southern Plantation and a Russian Estate (McFarland, 2022), readers will find a case-study comparison of the emancipation of Russian serfs on the Yazykov…
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In this conversation, Nick and Robbie discuss their recent sneaker choices and the importance of representation in sneaker collections during Pride Month. They highlight Adidas' comprehensive and inclusive Pride collection, while questioning Nike's absence from the conversation. They also touch on the significance of purpose-driven shoes that allow…
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Scholars working in archaeology, education, history, geography, and politics tell a nuanced story about the people and dynamics that reshaped this region and determined who would control it. The Ohio Valley possesses some of the most resource-rich terrain in the world. Its settlement by humans was thus consequential not only for shaping the geograp…
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