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As a monk, I bring a strong commitment, along with the renunciate flavor, to the classic Buddhist teachings. I play with ideas, with humor and a current way of expressing the teachings, but I don't dilute them. Sitting in a field of fifty to eighty people really starts my mind sparking. Since I don't prepare my talks ahead of time, I find myself listening to what I'm saying along with everyone else. This leaves a lot of room for the Dhamma to come up. Just having eighty people listening to m ...
 
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This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 31 August 2021, a last quarter moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Hiri-otappa and Guilt appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Sunday Talk with questions and answers was given by Ajahn Amaro on 21 January 2021 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly live-streamed on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Is the Buddha Alive Today? appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Sunday Talk with questions and answers was given by Ajahn Amaro on 15 August 2021 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly live-streamed on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Spiritual Birth Control appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 16 August 2021, a 1st quarter moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Who Knows? appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma QA was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 14 August 2021 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post To Ordain or Not to Ordain: is That the Question? appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Sunday Talk with questions and answers was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 8 August 2021 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Consciousness and Mindfulness appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Sunday Talk was given by Ajahn Amaro on 1 August 2021 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post All Wholesome States Can Be Included in the Four Noble Truths appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 24 July 2021, a full moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Āsāḷhā Pūjā: The Four Noble Truths appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 17 July 2021, a first quarter moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post What to Do with One’s Life appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 2 July 2021, a 1st quarter moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post Avijjā Paccayā Sankhārā appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 9 July 2021, a new moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It’s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati’s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post I Think, Therefore I Doubt appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
(Cittaviveka) Based on who we associate with and surround ourselves with, a field is generated where we pick up the behaviors and tonalities. One trains to generate a supportive field for training and learning. Whatever the field, open to what you’re in, get a feel for that, and aim for what is honorable, steady and balanced.…
 
(Cittaviveka) How we meet and move through our world determines our experience of it. If we can shift our volition, the world changes. Contemplate the proper intention for whatever you’re a part of – best thing to stop suffering is to be in harmony with it. Breathing in, breathing out, setting aside any hint of ill-will, open to your world with the…
 
(Cittaviveka) We use the forms of everyday life to notice what the mind makes out of them, the accumulations that occur. The theme is stay with the whole, stay connected, let the details go. What’s behind the inclination to move out? The stable reassuring quality of attention over the whole form – without ill-will, closing down, or dismissal – resu…
 
(Cittaviveka) By its nature, mind is absorptive. In skilful cultivation we steer that towards internal qualities of contentment, unity, release. This is how we are gladdened – the nervous system steadies and cools, body gets happy, mind composes itself, then you begin to see things clearly – what’s causing the distortions, stress and struggle, and …
 
(Cittaviveka) Kamma is a feedback loop of actions and results, out of which comes the experience of ‘me’. We use meditation to step out of the scenarios, recognize the process and change the patterns. Once you see it, you get the meaning – ‘a suffering being’– and the response is sympathy. Use the energy of breathing to calm and clear afflictive st…
 
(Cittaviveka) Bring attention to where body and mind come together in the upright. Upright is not just anatomical, but energetic – where you feel balanced, poised, wakeful. Relax the stress in body and mind with the calming effects of breathing. As mental and bodily energies gather and steady around the center, citta can rest here, and begin to exp…
 
(Cittaviveka) Suffering tends to isolate us into a small tight heap forming around a particular topic. In this narrow field we lose access to gladness, self-acceptance, and forgiveness. Breathing through the agitating energies, feel them as just that – it’s not personal, we can rise above. Willing to touch what’s difficult with gladness, we can mee…
 
(Cittaviveka) The Buddha teaches the middle way between the extremes. This quality of balance extends from right view, the recognition that actions extend beyond oneself – into the world around, to other people; it sets up what develops next for oneself. It matters which way the mind dips. Stay upright in that center that deepens into samādhi and w…
 
(Cittaviveka) When mindfulness is based on right view, there is understanding of skillful and unskillful mind-states and the effects they give rise to. Otherwise mindfulness is merely attention. Right mindfulness, established firmly in the body, has the quality of steadiness and stillness, witnessing and non-involvement with phenomena. Mindfulness …
 
(Cittaviveka) The way to make use of the closure of retreat is to harvest. Standing at the door of the mind, use the body for support to review the stuff of the mind from a balanced place. The upright axis cools the field of reactivity. Witnessing with disengagement, don’t be deceived by what appears internal and external, it’s all happening in the…
 
(Cittaviveka) The occasion of puja provides a useful link between our inner realities and outer circumstances. As we chant and make offerings, we’re open and receptive to the virtue, values, insights of our depth experience. The body picks up these signs as deep tissue memories, making these qualities available to enrich what we do in the external …
 
(Cittaviveka) Advice for specific sāti helpful in each posture. Establishing ground, steadiness and center while keeping awareness wide, allow dhammas to swim by, letting them all go. A certain strengthening effect comes from that.Ajahn Sucitto tarafından oluşturuldu
 
(Cittaviveka) Realization isn’t something you do, it’s something that arises from beyond yourself. When we stop reacting to the stirrings of our kammic field, stop creating a self, awareness can lift and witness – this is suffering, this is its origin, this is how it ceases. As we begin to wear out these distorted psychologies that make up the self…
 
(Cittaviveka) The nature of puja is it’s a direct participation in Dhamma. Setting aside what is not needed, boundaries of self and circumstance dissolve and there’s just the upright center, receptive. Surveying the field of kamma from this awakened position gives you a direction, a vantage point from which to navigate your day and your meditation.…
 
This Dhamma talk was given by Luang Por Sumedho on 24 June 2021, a full moon day, at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. It·s an audio version that was firstly published on Amaravati·s YouTube channel during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The post The Complaining Mind appeared first on Amaravati Buddhist Monastery.…
 
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